Prepare a short presentation (PowerPoint, Prezi, or similar) detailing the changes in life expectancy from 1950 to the most recent data available. Be sure to analyze differences between genders, races, and age classifications. Have the changes been cons

Locate the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus web page. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/ and https://medlineplus.gov/healthstatistics.html. Then identify the link to Health, United States 2017 (National Center for Health Statistics) attached below. On the Health, United States page, locate Data Finder and click on Life expectancy. On the ensuing page, open Table 15.Given the data contained therein, prepare a short presentation (PowerPoint, Prezi, or similar) detailing the changes in life expectancy from 1950 to the most recent data available. Be sure to analyze differences between genders, races, and age classifications. Have the changes been constant, equal?Assignment Overview:Overview: US Life Expectancy Changes US since 1950 (Details);Gender Differences (Details and Analysis – Are there differences? Why or Why Not?);Race Differences (Details and Analysis – Are there differences? Why or Why Not?)Age Groups Differences (Details and Analysis – Are there differences? Why or Why Not?)Summary: What Demographic Insights, Trends Contribute Most to the Overall Trends;Guidelines for Powerpoint Slides:Font-Size Minimum: 18 Point— It needs to be readable, if projected onto a screen;Use Bullet Points (Sentences/Phrases)— You are NOT writing a paper on slides;With headlines – There should probably NOT be more than 10-12 bullets per slide;Can use (Short) Paragraphs for direct quotes – Do NOT use them meet slide minimums;Slide Minimum: 6-slides Not including Title Slide(s) / Figures / Reference Slides;Ideally, you should have 10-15 slides – MAX 18 slides (Not including Figures/Tables)Trends alone is NOT enough— You must research, present and reference some analysis;The Analysis / Assertions / Insights about a Figure or Table need to be spelled out and referenced;EACH Assertion needs to have a Reference – ON the specific SLIDE, where the assertion is made;BONUS Question – If you want to change a population’s life expectancy, do you focus on the health of seniors OR on the health of babies…? And Why?Table 15. Life expectancy at birth, at age 65, and at age 75, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States,
selected years 1900–2016
Excel version (with more data years and standard errors when available): https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents2017.htm#015 .
[Data are based on death certificates]
White 1
All races
Specified age and year
Both sexes
Male
Female
At birth
Both sexes
Male
Black or African American 1,2
Female
Both sexes
Male
Female
Life expectancy in years
3,4
1900
19504
19604
1970
1975
1980
1990
1995
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2012
2013
20145
47.3
68.2
69.7
70.8
72.6
73.7
75.4
75.8
76.8
77.0
77.0
77.2
77.6
77.6
77.8
78.1
78.2
78.5
78.7
78.8
78.8
46.3
65.6
66.6
67.1
68.8
70.0
71.8
72.5
74.1
74.3
74.4
74.5
75.0
75.0
75.2
75.5
75.6
76.0
76.2
76.4
76.4
48.3
71.1
73.1
74.7
76.6
77.4
78.8
78.9
79.3
79.5
79.6
79.7
80.1
80.1
80.3
80.6
80.6
80.9
81.0
81.2
81.2
47.6
69.1
70.6
71.7
73.4
74.4
76.1
76.5
77.3
77.5
77.5
77.7
78.1
78.0
78.3
78.5
78.5
78.8
78.9
79.1
79.0
46.6
66.5
67.4
68.0
69.5
70.7
72.7
73.4
74.7
74.9
74.9
75.1
75.5
75.5
75.8
76.0
76.1
76.4
76.5
76.7
76.7
48.7
72.2
74.1
75.6
77.3
78.1
79.4
79.6
79.9
80.0
80.1
80.2
80.5
80.5
80.7
80.9
80.9
81.2
81.3
81.4
81.4
33.0
60.8
63.6
64.1
66.8
68.1
69.1
69.6
71.8
72.0
72.2
72.4
72.9
73.0
73.4
73.8
74.3
74.7
75.1
75.5
75.5
32.5
59.1
61.1
60.0
62.4
63.8
64.5
65.2
68.2
68.5
68.7
68.9
69.4
69.5
69.9
70.3
70.9
71.4
71.8
72.3
72.3
33.5
62.9
66.3
68.3
71.3
72.5
73.6
73.9
75.1
75.3
75.4
75.7
76.1
76.2
76.7
77.0
77.3
77.7
78.0
78.4
78.4
78.9
76.5
81.3
79.1
76.7
81.4
75.6
72.5
78.5
20155
78.7
76.3
81.1
78.9
76.6
81.3
75.5
72.2
78.5
20165
78.6
76.1
81.1






13.9
14.3
15.2
16.1
16.4
17.2
17.4
17.6
17.9
17.9
18.1
18.4
18.4
18.7
18.8
18.8
19.1
19.1
19.3
19.3
12.8
12.8
13.1
13.8
14.1
15.1
15.6
16.0
16.2
16.3
16.5
16.9
16.9
17.2
17.4
17.4
17.7
17.7
17.9
17.9
15.0
15.8
17.0
18.1
18.3
18.9
18.9
19.0
19.2
19.2
19.3
19.6
19.6
19.9
20.0
20.0
20.3
20.3
20.5
20.5
14.1
14.4
15.2
16.1
16.5
17.3
17.6
17.7
18.0
18.0
18.2
18.5
18.5
18.7
18.9
18.9
19.2
19.2
19.3
19.3
12.8
12.9
13.1
13.8
14.2
15.2
15.7
16.1
16.3
16.4
16.6
17.0
17.0
17.3
17.4
17.5
17.7
17.8
18.0
18.0
15.1
15.9
17.1
18.2
18.4
19.1
19.1
19.1
19.3
19.3
19.4
19.7
19.7
19.9
20.1
20.0
20.3
20.3
20.4
20.5
13.9
13.9
14.2
15.0
15.1
15.4
15.6
16.1
16.2
16.3
16.5
16.8
16.9
17.2
17.3
17.5
17.8
17.8
18.1
18.1
12.9
12.7
12.5
13.1
13.0
13.2
13.6
14.1
14.2
14.4
14.5
14.9
15.0
15.2
15.4
15.5
15.9
15.9
16.2
16.2
14.9
15.1
15.7
16.7
16.8
17.2
17.1
17.5
17.7
17.8
18.0
18.3
18.3
18.6
18.8
18.9
19.2
19.3
19.5
19.5
At 65 years
19504
19604
1970
1975
1980
1990
1995
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2012
2013
20145
19.4
18.0
20.6
19.4
18.0
20.6
18.2
16.4
19.7
20155
19.3
18.0
20.5
19.3
18.0
20.5
18.2
16.4
19.6
20165
19.4
18.0
20.6






Page 1 of 3
Trend Tables
Health, United States, 2017
Table 15. Life expectancy at birth, at age 65, and at age 75, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States,
selected years 1900–2016
Excel version (with more data years and standard errors when available): https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents2017.htm#015 .
[Data are based on death certificates]
White 1
All races
Specified age and year
Both sexes
Male
Female
Both sexes
1980
10.4
8.8
11.5
10.4
8.8
11.5

9.7
8.3
10.7
1990
10.9
9.4
12.0
11.0
9.4
12.0
10.2
8.6
11.2
At 75 years
Male
Black or African American 1,2
Female
Both sexes
Male
Female
Life expectancy in years
1995
11.0
9.7
11.9
11.1
9.7
12.0
10.2
8.8
11.1
2000
11.0
9.8
11.8
11.0
9.8
11.9
10.4
9.0
11.3
2001
11.2
9.9
12.0
11.2
10.0
12.1
10.5
9.0
11.5
2002
11.2
10.0
12.0
11.2
10.0
12.1
10.5
9.1
11.5
2003
11.3
10.1
12.1
11.3
10.2
12.1
10.7
9.2
11.6
2004
11.5
10.4
12.4
11.6
10.4
12.4
10.9
9.4
11.8
2005
11.5
10.4
12.3
11.5
10.4
12.3
10.9
9.4
11.7
2006
11.7
10.6
12.5
11.7
10.6
12.5
11.1
9.6
12.0
12.1
2007
11.9
10.7
12.6
11.9
10.8
12.6
11.2
9.8
2008
11.8
10.7
12.6
11.8
10.7
12.6
11.3
9.8
12.2
2009
12.1
11.0
12.9
12.1
11.0
12.9
11.6
10.2
12.5
2010
12.1
11.0
12.9
12.1
11.0
12.8
11.6
10.2
12.5
2012
12.2
11.2
12.9
12.1
11.1
12.9
11.8
10.4
12.7
2013
20145
12.2
11.2
12.9
12.1
11.1
12.9
11.8
10.4
12.7
12.3
11.2
13.1
12.2
11.2
13.0
11.9
10.6
12.8
20155
12.2
12.2
11.2
11.3
13.0
13.0
12.1

11.2

12.9

11.9

10.6

12.7

20165
White, not Hispanic
Specified age and year
Both sexes
Male
Hispanic6
Black, not Hispanic
Female
At birth
Both sexes
Male
Female
Both sexes
Male
Female
Life expectancy in years
2006
78.2
75.7
80.6
73.1
69.5
76.4
80.3
77.5
82.9
2007
78.4
75.9
80.8
73.5
69.9
76.7
80.7
77.8
83.2
83.3
2008
78.4
76.0
80.7
73.9
70.5
77.0
80.8
78.0
2009
78.7
76.3
81.0
74.4
71.0
77.4
81.1
78.4
83.5
2010
78.8
76.4
81.1
74.7
71.5
77.7
81.7
78.8
84.3
2012
20137
78.9
76.5
81.2
75.1
71.9
78.1
81.9
79.3
84.3
78.8
76.5
81.2
75.1
71.9
78.1
81.9
79.2
84.2
20145,7
78.8
76.5
81.2
75.3
72.2
78.2
82.1
79.4
84.5
20155,7
78.7
76.3
81.0
75.1
71.9
78.1
81.9
79.3
84.3
20165,7
78.5
76.1
81.0
74.8
71.5
77.9
81.8
79.1
84.2
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2012
20137
18.7
18.8
18.8
19.1
19.1
19.3
17.2
17.4
17.4
17.7
17.7
17.9
19.9
20.0
20.0
20.3
20.3
20.4
17.1
17.2
17.4
17.7
17.7
18.0
15.1
15.3
15.4
15.8
15.8
16.1
18.5
18.7
18.8
19.1
19.1
19.4
20.2
20.5
20.4
20.7
21.2
21.0
18.5
18.7
18.7
19.0
19.2
19.5
21.5
21.7
21.6
21.9
22.6
22.1
19.3
17.9
20.4
18.0
16.1
19.4
21.3
19.5
22.5
20145,7
19.3
18.0
20.5
18.1
16.3
19.5
21.5
19.7
22.8
20155,7
19.3
18.0
20.4
18.1
16.2
19.5
21.4
19.7
22.6
20165,7
19.3
18.0
20.5
18.0
16.2
19.5
21.4
19.7
22.7
At 65 years
Page 2 of 3
Trend Tables
Health, United States, 2017
Table 15. Life expectancy at birth, at age 65, and at age 75, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States,
selected years 1900–2016
Excel version (with more data years and standard errors when available): https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents2017.htm#015 .
[Data are based on death certificates]
White, not Hispanic
Specified age and year
Both sexes
Male
Hispanic6
Black, not Hispanic
Female
At 75 years
Both sexes
Male
Female
Both sexes
Male
Female
Life expectancy in years
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2012
20137
11.7
11.8
11.8
12.0
12.0
12.1
10.6
10.7
10.7
11.0
11.0
11.1
12.5
12.6
12.6
12.8
12.8
12.9
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.6
11.6
11.7
9.6
9.7
9.8
10.1
10.1
10.4
12.0
12.1
12.2
12.4
12.5
12.6
13.0
13.1
13.0
13.3
13.7
13.5
11.7
11.8
11.7
12.0
12.2
12.3
13.7
13.8
13.8
14.1
14.7
14.2
12.1
11.1
12.9
11.7
10.3
12.6
13.7
12.4
14.5
20145,7
12.2
11.2
13.0
11.8
10.5
12.7
13.9
12.6
14.8
20155,7
12.1
12.1
11.2
11.2
12.9
12.9
11.8
11.8
10.5
10.5
12.7
12.7
13.9
13.9
12.6
12.6
14.6
14.6
20165,7
– – – Data not available.
1
Life expectancy estimates for 2016 and beyond are no longer available for white and black or African American race groups. Estimates for white, not Hispanic, and black, not Hispanic groups
continue to be presented in this table.
2
Data shown for 1900–1960 are for the nonwhite population. Data for 1970 onwards are for the black or African American population only.
3
Death registration area only. The death registration area increased from 10 states and the District of Columbia (D.C.) in 1900 to the coterminous United States in 1933. See Appendix II,
Registration area.
4
Includes deaths of persons who were not residents of the 50 states and D.C.
5
Life expectancy estimates for 2014 and 2015 were revised using updated Medicare data; therefore, these values may differ from previous editions of Health, United States . Life expectancy
estimates for 2016 are based on preliminary Medicare data.
6
Hispanic origin was added to the U.S. standard death certificate in 1989 and was adopted by every state in 1997. Life expectancies for the Hispanic population are adjusted for underreporting of
Hispanic ethnicity on the death certificate, but they are not adjusted to account for the potential effects of return migration. To address the effects of age misstatement at the oldest ages, the
probability of death for Hispanic persons older than 80 years is estimated as a function of non-Hispanic white mortality with the use of the Brass relational logit model. See Appendix II, Hispanic
origin. See Appendix II, Race, for a discussion of sources of bias in death rates by race and Hispanic origin.
7
Tables by Hispanic origin are adjusted for race and Hispanic-origin misclassification with classification ratios. Life expectancy estimates for 2010–2016 use the updated classification ratios. See
NOTES section of this table.
NOTES: Populations for computing life expectancy for 1991–1999 are 1990-based postcensal estimates of the U.S. resident population. Starting with Health, United States, 2012 , populations for
computing life expectancy for 2001–2009 were based on revised intercensal population estimates of the U.S. resident population. Populations for computing life expectancy for 2010 were based
on 2010 Census counts. Life expectancy for 2011 and beyond was computed using 2010-based postcensal estimates. See Appendix I, Population Census and Population Estimates. In 1997, life
table methodology was revised to construct complete life tables by single years of age that extend to age 100 (available from: Anderson RN. Method for constructing complete annual U.S. life
tables. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2(129). 1999). Previously, abridged life tables were constructed for 5-year age groups ending with 85 years and over. In 2000, the life
table methodology was revised. The revised methodology is similar to that developed for the 1999–2001 decennial life tables. In 2008, the life table methodology was further refined. Estimates for
2001 and onwards were revised based on the methodology used in the 2008 life table report. Life expectancy for 2001–2016, except as noted in footnote 5, was calculated using data from
Medicare to supplement vital statistics and census data. Starting with Health, United States, 2016 , life expectancy for 2010–2016 was revised to take into account updated race and Hispanicorigin classification ratios. See: Arias E, Heron M, Hakes JK. The validity of race and Hispanic-origin reporting on death certificates in the United States: An update. National Center for Health
Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2(172). 2016. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_02/sr02_172.pdf. See Appendix II, Life expectancy. Starting with 2003 data, some states allowed
the reporting of more than one race on the death certificate. The multiple-race data for these states were bridged to the single-race categories of the 1977 Office of Management and Budget
standards, for comparability with other states. The race groups white and black include persons of Hispanic and non-Hispanic origin. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. See Appendix
II, Race. Data for additional years are available. See the Excel spreadsheet on the Health, United States website at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm. Some data were revised and differ from
previous editions of Health, United States .
SOURCE: NCHS, National Vital Statistics System, public-use Mortality Files; Grove RD, Hetzel AM. Vital statistics rates in the United States, 1940–1960. 1968; Arias E. United States life tables
by Hispanic origin. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2(152). 2010; United States life tables, 2001–2009 (using revised intercensal population estimates and a new
methodology implemented with the final 2008 life tables), United States life tables, 2010–2016 (based on a new methodology implemented with the final 2008 life tables and updated race and
Hispanic-origin classification ratios). Life table reports available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/life_tables.htm; Murphy SL, Xu JQ, Kochanek KD, Curtin SC, Arias E. Deaths: Final data
for 2015. National Vital Statistics Reports; vol 66 no 6. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2017. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_06.pdf;
unpublished 2015 life expectancy estimates for white and black persons at birth, at age 65, and at age 75; Xu JQ, Murphy SL, Kochanek KD, Bastian B, Arias E. Deaths: Final data for 2016.
National Vital Statistics Reports; vol 67. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2018. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/nvsr.htm. See Appendix I, National Vital
Statistics System (NVSS).
Page 3 of 3
Trend Tables
Health, United States, 2017

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Leave a Comment