Film Analysis Essay on a short segment from a film (under 5 minutes)

Step 1: Choose a short segment from a film (under 5 minutes). The choice is up to you but try to make it interesting. (Avoid Tarantino movies, The Shawshank Redemption, or Disney and Marvel.)Step 2: Use the film analysis template (on Blackboard) to analyze the segment shot-by-shot. You can print this out if you have a printer at home. Step 3: Watch the Powerpoint on BB about writing on film. Watch it twice! Step 4:Write a 2-3 page analysis/interpretation of the segment. This must take the form of an essay. It should have a clear argumentative thesis.* Address mise-en-scene and cinematography. Do not write extensively on sound. You may mention sound briefly if it’s relevant to your thesis. Do notturn in a mere description of the plot.Analyze and interpret. Refer to my examples “Maltese Falcon Analysis” and “American Beauty” on Blackboard. Steph 5:Review the checklist for film essays. Step 6:Proofread your paper and then upload your essay to Blackboard. Due Date: April 10th, 11:59pm. *Before you hand your paper in, read your last paragraph and ask yourself if your actual thesis is there rather than in your opening paragraph. WATCH THIS FROM MY PROFESSOR: https://app.vidgrid.com/view/xY9xvjGXk0fA/?sr=Nr6H…FILM ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENT
Step 1: Choose a short segment from a film (under 5 minutes). The choice is up to you but try to
make it interesting. (Avoid Tarantino movies, The Shawshank Redemption, or Disney and
Marvel.)
Step 2: Use the film analysis template (on Blackboard) to analyze the segment shot-by-shot.
You can print this out if you have a printer at home.
Step 3: Watch the Powerpoint on BB about writing on film. Watch it twice!
Step 4: Write a 2-3 page analysis/interpretation of the segment. This must take the form of an
essay. It should have a clear argumentative thesis.*
Address mise-en-scene and cinematography.
Do not write extensively on sound. You may mention sound briefly if it’s relevant to your
thesis.
Do not turn in a mere description of the plot. Analyze and interpret.
Refer to my examples “Maltese Falcon Analysis” and “American Beauty” on Blackboard.
Steph 5: Review the checklist for film essays.
Step 6: Proofread your paper and then upload your essay to Blackboard.
Due Date: April 10th, 11:59pm.
*Before you hand your paper in, read your last paragraph and ask yourself if your actual thesis
is there rather than in your opening paragraph.
Shot
Shot Type
Camera Movement Description
Do and Don’t Checklist
The Don’t List (points deducted)
1. Verb tense: Use the PRESENT TENSE to write about the image itself. Example: the
advertisement shows a new Dodge pickup on a mountainside. “Shows,” not “showed.”
2. Numbers: Spell out short numbers, usually one through ten. Example: The image depicts
six dogs of different breeds. “Six” not “6.”
3. Banned words/phrases: “I, personally.” “Amazing.” “plethora.” “iconic” (unless you’re
using the term in its semiotic meaning.) These have become cliché.
4. Names: The first time you cite an artist, filmmaker, etc. give full name. After that, use
the last name only. NEVER use just the first name. Example: “Alfred Hitchcock was often
called the ‘master of suspense.’ Hitchcock understood the difference between surprise
and suspense.” NEVER say, “In the late 1930s, producer David O. Selznick brought Alfred
to America.”
5. Avoid “you” to mean the viewer, spectator, reader, etc.: The more sophisticated way
of writing uses “we.” Example: “After the credits, we see the protagonist reading a
letter.” Many times, we don’t need the pronoun at all. For example: “After the credits, a
close-up shows the protagonist reading a letter.”
6. Don’t use the term “zoom” to refer to a track in.
7. Don’t confuse actors with the characters they portray.
The Do List (points earned)
1. Verb Tense: Use action verbs such as “depicts,” “signifies,” and “represents.” Use them
correctly!
2. Terminology: Show me you’ve learned something this semester. Use the terms we’ve
studied such as “signification” or “juxtaposition.” BUT . . . don’t just throw them in
haphazardly. Use them correctly. And don’t try to use all of them.
3. The first time you cite a film in the essay, identify the director and the year of release.

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